Institute for Transport Studies (ITS)

Student Profiles

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Bachelors degree & University:


ITS dissertation topic:


Supervisors:

Amalia Defiani

Indonesian

MSc Transport Planning

Indonesian Ministry of Transport

Architecture, Institute of Technology Bandung (ITB)

The Capacity and Circulation of Passenger Terminal Building in Middle-Sized Airports

Dr Darron Dixon-Hardy

What is it about transport that interests and motivates you to study it?
The urge to uplift well-being and equity in Indonesia's transport sector.

Why did you decide to study at ITS?
The institute offers a well-known worldwide reputation in transportation field and I am more than happy to take the opportunity to study here in ITS.

How would you describe the experience of being an ITS Masters student?
It is life-changing, a lot of new knowledge gained from experiencing different teaching methods and assessments than those I previously taken.

What have you enjoyed most about the first semester and what are you looking forward to in the next semester?
The field trip to Castleton, Peak District, which was so much fun! I am looking forward for the next field trip to Europe.

What have the lecture and seminars been like? And the teaching staff?
Some brought out a fresh perspective and a new way of looking transportation (as in sustainability issues and global perspective of climate changing) and most were interesting. The teachers are pro-active and nice.

How have you found living in Leeds and being part of the University?
Leeds is nice! Nice city with maybe not so costly in prices compares to other big cities in the UK. The campus located not far from the city centre where you can get almost anything you want. The University is superb, offering a lot of uniqueness in a form of societies and each of them may take you to a field trip to somewhere in the country!

What do you aim to do once you’ve completed your Masters?
I will be going back to my workplace, to continue working there for my government.

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking about studying for a Masters in transport at ITS?
ITS is a great name for enhancing your skills as transport planner.  The way ITS emphasizes more on policy making may help you in future problem solving regarding transport planning. Try to think positive and be tough though, since it is hard to study especially when you are an international student who is far away from home. Adjust well and you'll survive.


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Supervisors:

Eric Tetteh

Ghanaian

MSc Transport Planning 

Ministry of Transport, Ghana

Sociology with Economics minor, University of Ghana

Revamping the Ghana railway system - challenges and opportunities

Dr Tony Fowkes
Jeff Turner 

Why did you decide to study at ITS?
I was confused when I had three prestigious schools offering me admission at the same time for my Masters in transport. One of the schools was at Ohio University in the US, the others were the University of Leeds and Birmingham University, both in the UK.  To clear my confusion, I began to visit the websites of all these schools to see what each could offer me in terms of my career development. I finally settled on ITS (Leeds) because I realised that the transport programme here is interdisciplinary in nature and coupled with this are the excellent academic and service facilities, designed to meet student needs no matter their background, race or culture. I realised that the ITS programmes are practically orientated and provide close links with industry - which gives the practical aspects to the theory students undergo in the classroom. Guest lectures are also given by experts from across the private and public sectors, providing an insight to the various professions within transport. Industry also facilitates site visits which gives you the opportunity to learn from international best practice. I have not regretted making this choice.

What is it about transport that interests and motivates you to study it?
Transport is key to productivity and economic growth and therefore the success of every business.  People and business rely on it to provide the right connections to support and facilitate travel, production and distribution of goods and services. Transport problems are therefore societal problems and of major interest to me since it affects all of our lives every day. My sociological background means I’m interested in these wider problems, such as the chaotic traffic congestion and its accompanying pollution impact being experienced in rapidly urbanising countries. I’m interested in studying the problems of transport in order to try and come up with possible solutions.

How have you found living and socialising in the UK and in Leeds?
The experience of living in a new culture is a challenge, coupled with the fact that you have left your family and friends behind. Trying unfamiliar food was a discovery. However, it has been exciting, fun and led to new perspectives on life. It has made me enjoy a multi-cultural experience, as many of the friends I have made are from various backgrounds. The University’s clubs and societies have served as a great basis for my social interactions. Living in Leeds is a memorable experience.

How would you describe the experience of being an ITS Masters student?  
It’s been phenomenal and eye-opening. I have been working as a transport policy planner back home in my country but my experience at ITS has now made me understand this better.  Back home I was using abstract planning without knowing the anticipated impacts before implementation. The computer simulation and modelling programmes were something new to me and have broadened my knowledge. It has also been a lot of fun studying transport with my class - students with varied backgrounds converge to discuss our experiences. Every lecture is an experience and I learn something new. Inside and outside the classroom, my classmates make the time here fun and exciting. The coursework is interesting and enables me to do better research than I would usually do for exams or other office tasks. It also enabled me to draw synthesis from the various theories studied. It truly is an interdisciplinary field and you need to be open to seeing the different perspectives that emerge. Also, my experience of ITS and the many courseworks which compels me to use the library often has put me in contact with colleagues across the university, many of whom I would never have had the opportunity to meet. I have made many new friends.

What have you enjoyed most about the first semester and what are you looking forward to in the next semester? 
The various trips out of Leeds organised by the International Students Centre were fascinating and I would love to experience more of these this semester. The snow was also a new experience considering the climatic settings I came from. In all, the first semester was a good experience and I’m looking forward to more.

What have the lectures and seminars been like? And the teaching staff?
The experience I will always remember is the student-staff relationship. I have been so overwhelmed by the friendly manner in which both teaching and support staff helped students during the first semester. The lecturers make learning easier because they make students participate, thereby developing our communication skills. The seminars have helped the students to develop a set of transferable skills – to give presentations, study independently and work as a team. I am expecting this to continue through the next semester.  

What do you aim to do once you’ve completed your Masters? 
I am going back home to Ghana to transfer the knowledge acquired to help solve the numerous transport related problems that are emerging there.

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking about studying for a Masters at ITS?
It is simple. If you intend to pursue a career in any transport related discipline then ITS should be your destination. Here, lecturers are enthusiastic about their field and really help bring the subject matter to life. In short, ITS is the world bank of knowledge in transport studies. 

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Supervisors:

Rohit Sinha

Indian

MSc Transport Planning & the Environment 

Self funding

Civil Engineering, National Institute of  Technology, Patna, India

Micro-simulating the traffic flow and  environmental impacts of a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane

Dr James Tate

Why did you decide to study at ITS? 
I wanted my Masters from an Institute of repute and somewhere with a social life - both are important for holistic growth. I researched many possibilities and there was nowhere better than the University of Leeds, which offered both aspects. I also asked my Professors and they recommended ITS. I had applied to other Institutes but I finally zeroed in on Leeds because of its reputation.

What is it about transport that interests and motivates you to study it?
I did a Civil Engineering undergraduate degree and enjoyed it, as it gives pragmatic approaches for tackling real life problems. I liked the transportation course in particular, as transport has a ubiquitous presence in our daily life. A simple construction of road to connect a remote place holds the potential to change the lives of the people in that area. Transport is a subject which combines both the ‘hard’ science of geometric design, engineering and maths with the ‘soft’ disciplines of social sciences - and how transport decisions can transcend and change the social structure of an area.

How have you found living in the UK and Leeds in particular?
There are regular trips organised by the University to visit other parts of the UK. Global Cafe is  organised every Monday where all international students can go and meet new people – it’s a great way to socialize with your peers. I would just say it's been great - the people are very friendly. I have walked back home at odds hours and have never felt any security issues. Leeds is a great student city - there is so much to do. There are always events on in the Student Union and there are clubs for every hobby. It's your take as to how much you want to take away from here.

How would you describe the experience of being an ITS Masters student?  
Hard and challenging. There is so much to read and discuss for the courseworks, but it’s a very good learning curve. There is a lot of self-study required for each module; everyone gets stuck at almost the same point in a coursework and it requires a lot of   discussion, but in the end it’s all worth it. The process makes you think a lot and that's the beauty of the learning - you get to apply the concepts learnt in the lectures to real life situations.

What have you enjoyed most about the first semester and what are you looking forward to in the next semester? 
The modules in the first semester were very good and gave me a good understanding of what transport is all about. In the second semester I am looking forward to broadening my horizons and starting work on my dissertation. Apart from my studies, I have made some good friends here and I enjoyed trips to Liverpool and Cambridge

What have the lecture and seminars been like? And the teaching staff?
Lectures have been great. Complex concepts are made simple and delivered in a lucid manner. The teaching staff are very helpful and take care of all the academic matters in a friendly manner.

What do you aim to do once you’ve completed your Masters?
I will be applying for jobs in consultancy.

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking about studying for a Masters at ITS?
I would say go for it. It is a place where you can do work hard on  weekdays and party hard on weekends. You will surely make some great friends and life will change for the better. It all depends on you as to how much you extract. This place offers everything.

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Supervisors:

Marc Fialkoff

American

MSc Sustainability (Transport) 

US-UK Fulbright

Political Science with Chemistry minor, Gettysburg College, PA, USA

Port Centric Logistics: Analysis at the Humber Ports of Hull and Immingham

Dr Tony Whiteing
Dr Gerard de Jong

As a Fulbright Scholar you are following in the footsteps of many famous and prestigious US citizens - why did you choose to come to ITS? 
I chose ITS after seeing that of all the UK institutions that have transport studies programs, ITS at Leeds was the best. What attracted me to ITS and the MSc Sustainability (Transport) was the interdisciplinary nature of the course and the crossover with the Sustainability Research Institute in the School of Earth and Environment. Coming from an interdisciplinary background, this was my first choice. Part of the Fulbright program is building international understanding in areas of study; learning transportation studies from world-renowned faculty members definitely feeds into the ideal.

What is it about transport that interests and motivates you to study it? 
My dad is a transportation engineer back in the United States and I have always marvelled at the projects he worked on when I was younger. He has been all over the world and I have been lucky to see some of his projects from conceptual drawings to actually riding on the finished project. When I started studying public policy at Gettysburg, it gave me a chance to begin to understand what my dad does and allowed me to find my own interests within the field. I found that transport studies is a perfect intersection of science and policy and the work I have been doing at ITS makes this even more evident.

How would you describe the experience of being an ITS Masters student?  
Amazing, it has been a lot of fun studying transport with the class I am in. Every lecture is an experience and I learn something new. Inside and outside the classroom, my classmates make the time here fun and exciting. The coursework is interesting and makes me look at transport from different perspectives. It truly is an interdisciplinary field and you need to be open to seeing the different perspectives that emerge.
What have you enjoyed most about the first semester and what are you looking forward to in the next semester? 
Induction week and the field-trip around Leeds were really fun. It gave all of us time to really get to know one another. It was really interesting to hear where everyone in our class comes from. Inside the classroom, I would have to say I particularly enjoyed the Transport Planning and Policy module. The discussions that emerged during our lectures were interesting and forced us to look at our own of opinions of transport and at times re-evaluate them.

Next semester, I am looking forward to my module in Green Logistics and doing my fieldwork at Hull and Immingham for my dissertation. In addition to the semester activities, I am really excited about the ITS field trip to Europe and my own travelling to Ireland.

What have the lectures and seminars been like? And the teaching staff/faculty?
At first glance, I did not realise that the material we would be reading in our classes are written by the faculty members of ITS. I thought that would be a bit intimidating, but once I was in Leeds and met the Professors and started attending the lectures, I found the faculty are amazing. They are very approachable and enjoy challenging us to think ‘outside the box’ and see new perspectives on transport related issues. They make material which can be challenging, interesting and easy to understand. The examples we learn in class are not theoretical, but are scenarios and projects that are ongoing which makes understanding them even easier.

How have you found living in the UK and Leeds in particular?
Living in the UK and Leeds has been a lot of fun. Gettysburg is a small college with about 2,700 students so coming to the University of Leeds and Leeds in general would be a challenge, but it has been an easy transition. Leeds has a lot of events in the city centre such as the Christmas Market and the ice skating rink. Also, being in Leeds allows me the opportunity to travel to places close to Leeds for day trips which has been a lot of fun.

...and the social life at the University of Leeds? 
During the first semester, I took up Jiu Jitsu which has been a lot of fun, although a bit daunting when it is your first martial arts. In addition to Jiu Jitsu, my classmates and I do stuff outside the classroom. When I needed to go to York to judge a debate, a friend from ITS accompanied me and we made a day trip to explore the city and sights (including the rail museum).

You’ve travelled quite a bit around the UK – what have been the highlights?
The University offers day trips to places such as Liverpool and Cambridge which were a lot of fun. During the Christmas Break, I travelled to Stonehenge, Bath, and spent some time in London. The highlight of my travels in the UK has to be the time I spent in Cornwall and Plymouth. During my time in Cornwall, I was taken to a Cornish Mine and saw the regeneration projects going on in the region. Although the weather was not too good on the few days we were in Cornwall, on the last day when we were in St. Ives, the sun came out and we were able to see the Atlantic Ocean from the beach and walk around St. Ives which was stunning. The tiny streets and the waterfront were truly amazing and things I will not forget.

You have already achieved a lot in your life, including some academic publications , teaching assistantship and as an Eisenhower Institute Undergraduate Fellow – tell us more…
Gettysburg really allowed me to explore my interests in political science and chemistry. The Eisenhower Institute is a public policy program that allows students to work on policy areas that are of interest to them. The program is led by Susan Eisenhower, the granddaughter of President Eisenhower and the program gave us the opportunity to meet public policy makers in the US and learn what they do. For me, I was interested in the environment, infrastructure, and nuclear non-proliferation. Being a political science major and chemistry minor allowed me to be an assistant in courses such as Organic Chemistry and Constitutional Law as well as write some articles on Constitutional Law and an Organic Chemistry Manual. In the area of Nuclear Non-Proliferation, myself and some friends organized a team to represent the US at a Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty Simulation held in Washington DC. At the end of the conference, our team was awarded the Most Outstanding Delegation award for our work during the simulation.

What do you plan to do once you’ve completed your Masters? 
Prior to being awarded the Fulbright Award and coming to ITS, I was accepted to Roger Williams University School of Law in Rhode Island. After I finish my studies at ITS, I plan to return to the US to start my law degree. My work at ITS dovetails nicely with my law degree because I am working on a maritime-based dissertation and Roger Williams specializes in Maritime Law. I am contemplating going for my PhD in Maritime Affairs to tie law, transportation, and maritime affairs together and hopefully will be able to teach in these areas.

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking about studying for a Masters at ITS?
Be prepared to hit the ground running. ITS is a wonderful place and the courses are great but be prepared to work on day one. Be open to new ideas and have fun. The year goes fast and enjoy every day of the program.

Name:

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Bachelors degree & University:



ITS dissertation topic:


Supervisor:

Hsin Pei Shan

Taiwanese

Transport Economics 

NCKU

Transportation and Communication Management, National Cheng Kung University

The take-up of alternative fuel vehicles

Dr Simon Shepherd

Why did you decide to study at ITS?  
The main reason why I chose ITS is its good reputation - especially in transport economics, as only few universities offer this programme. ITS also has a significant reputation for transport research. Finally, I believe this degree will help me find a good job.

What is it about transport that interests and motivates you to study it?
Transport is a necessity for humans’ daily lives, and good planning, analysis, investment and a long-term vision of transport can have a profound effect on societies.
Transport is also a subject that has both practical and theoretical aspects, and it’s this that appeals to me.

How have you found living in the UK and Leeds in particular?
The lifestyle here in the UK is different from that in Taiwan. I have to be more independent and adjust to the way of life. Leeds is a small but perfectly formed city and almost all of what I need can be found in the city centre. It’s a good place for shopping, in particular for foreign students since a variety of international goods are sold here.
Time management is also more important in UK, since early booked train tickets are much cheaper - for example when travelling to London for transport related conferences.

How would you describe the experience of being an ITS Masters student?  
It is an amazing experience to be a student at ITS. My classmates come from all over the world and it’s very interesting to hear about various transport applications in different countries. A feature of lectures here I admire the most is that students can apply what they have learned to the coursework, as the requirements of the courseworks are closely related to the content of lectures.

What have you enjoyed most about the first semester and what are you looking forward to in the next semester? 
Although it was a really challenging time when the courseworks and exams were due, I felt so confident after I finally finished them. In the next semester we will have the chance to work as a group, and I expect to exchange ideas with my classmates - it will be a useful way of building my English language skills as well as developing my academic thinking. 

What have the lectures and seminars been like? And the teaching staff?
All the ITS lecturers and staff are friendly and willing to help solve any problems we have. They offer plentiful resources and information related to our studies and the interactions between students and lecturers are good. The external seminar speakers are also helpful in providing us with opportunities to learn about applications of transport in the real world.

What do you aim to do once you’ve completed your Masters? 
I would like to join a transport consultancy after graduation since I believe this is the most direct way to apply what I have learned, in dealing with various practical transport issues.

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking about studying for a Masters at ITS? 
ITS won’t be a disappointment for anyone interested in studying transport.  ITS is suitable for those who have their own views on transport issues and are willing to discuss these with others -  the principles covered in the lectures are strongly linked to the real world.

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Supervisors:

Leonora Baddoo

British

MSc (Eng) Transport Planning & Engineering

Self funded

BSc Engineering Science, Smith College, Massachusetts, USA

A review of energy saving and night-time  driving safety: are they in a dilemma?

Dr Haibo Chen

Why did you decide to study at ITS?
It was a tough decision to make because I had also thought about studying in Edinburgh and hadn’t initially wanted to live in Leeds! I had a cousin who was on the same course last year at ITS though, and continually talked about how good the ITS programme was, compared to a lot of others in the UK who offer similar degrees. After a lot of deliberation on cost of tuition and living; distance to family; location; how long the programme had been established for, and ranking of the institutions, Leeds emerged the winner...and here I am!

What is it about transport that interests and motivates you to study it?
During my undergraduate degree, I realised that I wanted to be able to contribute towards sustaining and improving urban and rural economies through transport. I had learned in social studies in school how good transport networks help fresh food producers – for example, farmers and fishermen - to deliver their produce across the country for sale.   On inadequate transport networks, the goods perish before they reach their destination so producers lose income and the country loses revenue. I wanted to acquire skills on how to develop and maintain sustainable transport solutions anywhere in the world, and know how to adapt these skills – both technical and cultural – to problems requiring lasting solutions with limited resources.

How have you found living and socialising in Leeds?
I really like living here. I’m within a 20-minute walk to the city centre and have found my way around the city centre shopping precinct, various eateries and entertainment spots. I attend a lively Anglican church in the centre of town and have joined its choir as well. I enjoy the diversity of my flat – Chinese, Malaysian and Ghanaian flatmates - and also that of my classmates. I have picked up a few Chinese words and been introduced to dishes one wouldn’t usually get at a takeaway shop!

How would you describe the experience of being an ITS Masters student? 
It is a multi-disciplinary experience. Transport, although a specialised topic in itself, also has disciplines within it as considered at ITS: economics, environment, sustainability, engineering and planning. Even as an engineering stream student, you learn to appreciate aspects of the other disciplines...which I haven’t always easily understood! But I realise that one must be aware of the impacts transport has in these areas in order to make informed decisions in future careers. My classmates are from varied backgrounds and countries; one discovers that each student has his or her own reasons for studying transport and is passionate about particular aspects of the course. Also, the manner in which different personalities interact, make for lively debate in and out of the classroom.

What have you enjoyed most about the first semester and what are you looking forward to in the next semester?
Getting to know people and feeling my way around the structure of the programme. This semester I’m looking forward to learning from mistakes I made last semester, to improve upon my academic performance. I am also looking forward to the European field trip in the summer after the exams!

What have the lectures and seminars been like? And the teaching staff?
The lectures open the students’ eyes to a variety of issues which one may not have thought about before. For instance, comparing road accident rates across different countries is not as simple as one thinks, because of discrepancies in defining terms such as fatal and serious injuries. Fieldwork gives us reasons to don bright neon yellow jackets and count cars in the cold and wet weather. External speakers at seminars provide opportunities to hear about transport research in The Hague; how Leeds city centre was pedestrianised; progress on reducing vehicle emissions in West Yorkshire; membership with professional institutions, to name a few. Teaching staff are approachable, and most are on first-name basis with the students. The wealth of expertise in the Institute is overwhelming, and one cannot help but feel proud to be rubbing shoulders with recognised figures in the industry.

What do you aim to do once you’ve completed your Masters?
I hope to go back to live with my family in Ghana and work in transport or development-related sectors.

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking about studying for a Masters at ITS? 
It’s a lot of hard work, but it’s worth it. The facilities and resources are great, and networking opportunities abound whether in  the lecture room or outside it. One will generally leave the  university, a more enriched individual.


Name:

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Bachelors degree & University:



ITS dissertation topic:

Supervisor:

Peter Yawson

Ghanaian

MSc (Eng) Transport Planning & Engineering 

Government of Ghana / World Bank

BSc Civil Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana

What catches drivers attention?

Dr Frank Lai

Why did you decide to study at ITS? 
I decided to study at ITS through recommendations by my senior engineering colleagues who are alumni of ITS. This was after I had expressed a desire to undertake further studies in transport.   My working experience after my first degree has been in feeder roads (roads to rural farming communities) development and construction management. But the current development direction in Ghana is supporting the upgrading of most of these roads into higher geometrical standards. These developments have their attendant environmental and safety issues. Therefore when I decided to undertake further studies in transport my senior colleague recommended ITS of Leeds to me as one of the best Transport Studies Institutes one can attend.

What is it about transport that interests and motivates you to study it? 
I have always had interest and concern for issues of safety on the road and the environment. Transport affects the environment and vice versa but the extent could not easily be imagined until I came to ITS.

How have you found living and socialising in Leeds? 
Living in Leeds has been wonderful (of course not forgetting my initial encounter with the cold weather condition, as someone from a warmer climate).  The city is beautiful and calm. People are generally approachable. There is always a welcome for you whether at a health facility, the bank, a bookshop, a commercial centre and indeed anywhere else within the city and on campus.  People are always ready to assist if you request for their assistance. I am very comfortable in the mist of my colleagues on the course and will dare to say that we are a wonderful representation of a diverse cultural and social background. 

How would you describe the experience of being an ITS Masters student? 
I feel honoured to have had this opportunity to be an ITS Masters student. I have been exposed to a very wide range of transport and environmental issues which I never could imagine. The extent of research and studies that have been done in various dimensions and aspects of transport and the environment is amazing. The opportunity to be taught by and interact with such seasoned researchers and professionals is rare. This offers me a better opportunity to contribute to the road safety efforts of my agency back home in Ghana.

What have you enjoyed most about the first semester and what are you looking forward to in the next semester?  
The first semester was very busy and I enjoyed the statistics, and modelling lectures (including all the modelling based courseworks).  The field trips, especially to see the public transport infrastructure in Leeds (the guided bus-ways) were an exciting experience.  I look forward to the specific experiences of the optional modules of semester two and other field trips, in order to make my ITS Masters student experience more complete.

What have the lectures and seminars been like? And the teaching staff? 
The pace of lectures and studies requires one to be always on the move because there is a lot to be covered. The lectures and seminars have been very complementary which is very significant. The seminars contributed further understanding to treated topics. 
One or two lectures were delivered in a rush and therefore did not communicate the understanding to me, but this is very minute compared to the entire semester one lectures. The teaching staff are just wonderful. They exhibited clear control over all the topics and were always ready to listen or arrange an appointment on issues concerning the topics for any student or group of students. The VLE discussion board was very supportive of academic work.

What do you aim to do once you’ve completed your Masters? 
I am being sponsored by my agency (through the Government of Ghana/IDA of World Bank), and therefore will go back home to share my experience with other colleagues regarding safety issues in road infrastructure design. Secondly, I represent the agency at the regional road safety committee where I hope to contribute a lot in their regional activities. I also plan to undertake research studies in driver distraction in the Ghanaian context to support the effort of the Ghana Road Safety Commission to promote road user safety issues.

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking about studying for a Masters at ITS?

  • There is a lot to be done within the study period and therefore one should be ready to work hard and plan ones time well.
  • Basic computing knowledge (including internet) is very key in information search, retrieval, usage, application and dissemination.
  • Basic mathematical background in statistics, probability and algebra is an advantage.
  • Last but not the least, ask if you don’t know, and you will be taught.

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